Desert in Bloom: “Grayhawk gold”

Thanks to the last nine months of dry weather, everything is slower than usual this year in the Arizona desert. One only needs to look at this once beautiful patch of prickly pears in our neighborhood to see how tough the dry desert heat has been on nature in the last four years.

For a while I though we might not even get our beautiful desert bloom this year. And then suddenly this week, with temperatures reaching up to the low 90s°F, the desert trees and the bushes decided to welcome spring this year.

Here are some of the scenes of blooming Palo Verde trees from our neighborhood from the last two days. I call it the “Grayhawk gold.” And you don’t even have to dig for it. 🙂


UPDATE APRIL 18, 2018

OUR FRONT YARD

Here’s what our front yards looks like today. Both Joshua Tree (white candelabras) and Palo Verde (yellow flowers) are in full bloom.

 


UPDATE APRIL 19, 2018

HIGH WINDS: ENEMY OF DESERT BLOOM, FRIEND OF ARIZONA ALLERGIES

Dust, high winds return to Phoenix for second week

One week ago today, Elizabeth and I were driving from Phoenix to Tucson and facing the high winds which usually buffet our state at this time of the year.

“Today, it’s worse,” Elizabeth she said as she drove back home early this evening from running some errands.

Here’s a CBS new story about it…

Here we go again! More strong winds are sweeping through the Phoenix-metro area.

A blowing dust advisory has been issued until 7 p.m. for Casa Grande, Florence, Maricopa and Queen Creek.

Around 2 p.m., areas of dense blowing dust started developing southeast of Phoenix.

Winds were reported at 30 mph.  It was just last Thursday when we saw another afternoon of high winds and blowing dust.

[RELATED: Windy, dusty day makes for hazardous driving conditions, Apr 12, 2018]

The peak wind gust so far on this Thursday has been at Springerville (in eastern Arizona) where the wind reached 71 miles an hour.

16578717_G (Source: ADOT)


 

UPDATE APRIL 20, 2018

POST NUBILA, PHOEBUS: CACTUS SUNFLOWER

One good thing about Arizona windstorms is that they don’t last long. And they bring some cooler air from the Pacific. So this morning, we awoke to a beautifully clear day.

The cacti liked it, too. Take a look at this “Cactus Sunflower” that opened this morning in our pool are. Yesterday, it was just a pink bud. Now, the flower is as big as half the cactus.

Want to know why I call them “sunflowers” (besides the obvious resemblance). Because they always open up toward the east, facing the rising sun in the morning. And by the evening, they are closed again. Just a little desert trivia for you.

Notice also little baby cacti at the base of the plant? They look like a crown.

BTW – for those who may not have studied Latin in school, “post nubila, phoebus” means “after the clouds, the sun.”

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